Issue Two of The Magazine of The Artist’s Institute, New York
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Pierre Huyghe

314 × 241 mm, 212 pp

Published by The Artist’s Institute
and Koenig Books

The Magazine takes each season of The Artist’s Institute as a point of departure for new criticism, journalism, fiction, interviews, and artist projects, developed around the work of a single artist. The first issue is with Pierre Huyghe.

Pierre’s covers the recent work and research interests of Pierre Huyghe – featuring topics as varied as genetic engineering, new realist philosophy and the science fiction of Philip K. Dick – to draw a complex portrait of the artist’s practice. Contributors include A. E. Benenson, Stephen Blackwell, Ali H. Brivanlou, Etienne Chambaud, Ian Cheng, Angelique Corthals, Melissa Dubbin & Aaron S. Davidson, Tristan Garcia, Camille Henrot, David Horvitz, Pierre Huyghe, Jenny Jaskey, Jonathan Lethem, Alex Mar, Vladimir Nabokov, Vincent Normand, Fernando Ortega, Jean Painlevé, Sean Raspet, Martin Roth, Dorion Sagan, Dash Shaw, Fabrien Giraud and Raphaël Siboni, and Karl Sims.

Awarded one of The Most Beautiful Swiss Books of 2015.

 

Awarded one of 'The Most Beautiful Swiss Books' of 2015
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Pierre Huyghe

314 × 241 mm, 212 pp

Published by The Artist’s Institute
and Koenig Books

The Magazine takes each season of The Artist’s Institute as a point of departure for new criticism, journalism, fiction, interviews, and artist projects, developed around the work of a single artist. The first issue is with Pierre Huyghe.

Pierre’s covers the recent work and research interests of Pierre Huyghe – featuring topics as varied as genetic engineering, new realist philosophy and the science fiction of Philip K. Dick – to draw a complex portrait of the artist’s practice. Contributors include A. E. Benenson, Stephen Blackwell, Ali H. Brivanlou, Etienne Chambaud, Ian Cheng, Angelique Corthals, Melissa Dubbin & Aaron S. Davidson, Tristan Garcia, Camille Henrot, David Horvitz, Pierre Huyghe, Jenny Jaskey, Jonathan Lethem, Alex Mar, Vladimir Nabokov, Vincent Normand, Fernando Ortega, Jean Painlevé, Sean Raspet, Martin Roth, Dorion Sagan, Dash Shaw, Fabrien Giraud and Raphaël Siboni, and Karl Sims.

Awarded one of The Most Beautiful Swiss Books of 2015.

 

Issue One of The Magazine of The Artist’s Institute, New York
1 / 58

Pierre Huyghe

314 × 241 mm, 212 pp

Published by The Artist’s Institute
and Koenig Books

The Magazine takes each season of The Artist’s Institute as a point of departure for new criticism, journalism, fiction, interviews, and artist projects, developed around the work of a single artist. The first issue is with Pierre Huyghe.

Pierre’s covers the recent work and research interests of Pierre Huyghe – featuring topics as varied as genetic engineering, new realist philosophy and the science fiction of Philip K. Dick – to draw a complex portrait of the artist’s practice. Contributors include A. E. Benenson, Stephen Blackwell, Ali H. Brivanlou, Etienne Chambaud, Ian Cheng, Angelique Corthals, Melissa Dubbin & Aaron S. Davidson, Tristan Garcia, Camille Henrot, David Horvitz, Pierre Huyghe, Jenny Jaskey, Jonathan Lethem, Alex Mar, Vladimir Nabokov, Vincent Normand, Fernando Ortega, Jean Painlevé, Sean Raspet, Martin Roth, Dorion Sagan, Dash Shaw, Fabrien Giraud and Raphaël Siboni, and Karl Sims.

Awarded one of The Most Beautiful Swiss Books of 2015.

 

Issue One of The Magazine of The Artist’s Institute, New York
1 / 58

Pierre Huyghe

314 × 241 mm, 212 pp

Published by The Artist’s Institute
and Koenig Books

The Magazine takes each season of The Artist’s Institute as a point of departure for new criticism, journalism, fiction, interviews, and artist projects, developed around the work of a single artist. The first issue is with Pierre Huyghe.

Pierre’s covers the recent work and research interests of Pierre Huyghe – featuring topics as varied as genetic engineering, new realist philosophy and the science fiction of Philip K. Dick – to draw a complex portrait of the artist’s practice. Contributors include A. E. Benenson, Stephen Blackwell, Ali H. Brivanlou, Etienne Chambaud, Ian Cheng, Angelique Corthals, Melissa Dubbin & Aaron S. Davidson, Tristan Garcia, Camille Henrot, David Horvitz, Pierre Huyghe, Jenny Jaskey, Jonathan Lethem, Alex Mar, Vladimir Nabokov, Vincent Normand, Fernando Ortega, Jean Painlevé, Sean Raspet, Martin Roth, Dorion Sagan, Dash Shaw, Fabrien Giraud and Raphaël Siboni, and Karl Sims.

Awarded one of The Most Beautiful Swiss Books of 2015.

 

Issue One of The Magazine of The Artist’s Institute, New York
1 / 58

Pierre Huyghe

314 × 241 mm, 212 pp

Published by The Artist’s Institute
and Koenig Books

The Magazine takes each season of The Artist’s Institute as a point of departure for new criticism, journalism, fiction, interviews, and artist projects, developed around the work of a single artist. The first issue is with Pierre Huyghe.

Pierre’s covers the recent work and research interests of Pierre Huyghe – featuring topics as varied as genetic engineering, new realist philosophy and the science fiction of Philip K. Dick – to draw a complex portrait of the artist’s practice. Contributors include A. E. Benenson, Stephen Blackwell, Ali H. Brivanlou, Etienne Chambaud, Ian Cheng, Angelique Corthals, Melissa Dubbin & Aaron S. Davidson, Tristan Garcia, Camille Henrot, David Horvitz, Pierre Huyghe, Jenny Jaskey, Jonathan Lethem, Alex Mar, Vladimir Nabokov, Vincent Normand, Fernando Ortega, Jean Painlevé, Sean Raspet, Martin Roth, Dorion Sagan, Dash Shaw, Fabrien Giraud and Raphaël Siboni, and Karl Sims.

Awarded one of The Most Beautiful Swiss Books of 2015.

 

New graphic identity and website
1 / 58

2016
New York 

We have produced a new graphic identity for The Artist's Institute in New York to co-incide with their move to new premises on the Upper East side. The scope of works includes publications, website, signage and printed matter. More images coming soon. See also Pierre's magazine, issue one of The Magazine of The Artist's Institute.

The Artist’s Institute is a non-profit research and exhibition space for contemporary art that dedicates six-month seasons to a single artist whose work prompts a series of public programs with related artists and thinkers.

The Artist’s Institute was founded in 2010 in partnership with Hunter College. In its five-year history the Institute has presented seasons featuring Robert Filliou, Jo Baer, Jimmie Durham, Rosemarie Trockel, Haim Steinbach, Thomas Bayrle, Lucy McKenzie, Pierre Huyghe, Carolee Schneemann and Fia Backström.

New lettering at the stern of Nelson’s ship
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Drawn and directed by John Morgan studio
Painted by Phil Surey
Guidance and historical research 
by James Mosley
October 2015

The name of HMS Victory, the oldest ship of the Royal Navy still in commission, launched in 1765, has been repainted. When Victory was repainted, many times over, during the 19th and 20th centuries, the name was naturally also redone, so the original letters were replaced. In 2005, when the ship was refurbished for the two-hundredth anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar, the name was painted in a roman letter that was based on the inscription on the Column of Trajan in Rome, a style which was used during the 20th century for lettering on many historical monuments. Unfortunately this was a style that was quite unknown in Britain in 1805. During the current repainting of the ship, the style of the name has been painted in a bold and vigorous style that is based on the traditional lettering that is known to have been in use at that date. (James Mosley)

Graphic identity, Art Direction

September 2013–ongoing

ArtReview, founded in London in 1949, evolved from an eight-page, black-and-white broadsheet to a magazine distributed in 28 countries and published nine times a year. Since the first issue in the 1940s, the cover has traditionally featured a self-portrait. Following our total redesign of the magazine and its sister publication ArtReview Asia in September 2013, we continue to art direct and develop the design of each issue and special editions, including the Power 100 and Future Greats. 

Barbican exhibition graphics and book
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Exhibition curated by Catherine Ince

Exhibition design by 6a architects

21 October 2015–14 February 2016

We produced the exhibition graphics, the publication and the marketing items for the exhibition at the Barbican Centre, London.

Structured thematically, the exhibition presents a complex portrait of these internationally celebrated designers in the context of the inner world of their Office and network, alongside the political, cultural and social conditions which enabled and influenced their work. The Eameses’ pioneering ‘multi-media architecture’ and preoccupation with different modes of visual communication, particularly film and photography as tools for modelling ideas, is foregrounded as the most vital and relevant legacy of their oeuvre. These ground-breaking installation projects were developed for both corporate and government clients and aimed to popularise burgeoning computer technologies or present visions of America at home and abroad in the context of the Cold War. An in-depth look at the Eameses’ pedagogical work and self-initiated projects reveals an enduring interest in learning and creativity and their fascination with diverse cultures, modes of play and rituals. The exhibition also addresses Charles and Ray Eames’ impact on 20th century concepts of modern living: their editorial ‘eye’ and mastery of form and material yielded some of the most iconic designs of all time, not least their own home – a construction continually celebrated since its completion in 1949. (Barbican) 

Barbican exhibition graphics and book
1 / 58

Exhibition curated by Catherine Ince

Exhibition design by 6a architects

21 October 2015–14 February 2016

We produced the exhibition graphics, the publication and the marketing items for the exhibition at the Barbican Centre, London.

Structured thematically, the exhibition presents a complex portrait of these internationally celebrated designers in the context of the inner world of their Office and network, alongside the political, cultural and social conditions which enabled and influenced their work. The Eameses’ pioneering ‘multi-media architecture’ and preoccupation with different modes of visual communication, particularly film and photography as tools for modelling ideas, is foregrounded as the most vital and relevant legacy of their oeuvre. These ground-breaking installation projects were developed for both corporate and government clients and aimed to popularise burgeoning computer technologies or present visions of America at home and abroad in the context of the Cold War. An in-depth look at the Eameses’ pedagogical work and self-initiated projects reveals an enduring interest in learning and creativity and their fascination with diverse cultures, modes of play and rituals. The exhibition also addresses Charles and Ray Eames’ impact on 20th century concepts of modern living: their editorial ‘eye’ and mastery of form and material yielded some of the most iconic designs of all time, not least their own home – a construction continually celebrated since its completion in 1949. (Barbican) 

Edited by Bruce Hainley

Raven Row and Koenig Books, London

224 × 150 mm, 208 pp

2015

Edited by Bruce Hainley, Commie Pinko Guy is the first European monograph devoted to the photo-based work of artist Larry Johnson (born 1959, Long Beach, California).

As part of a generation of artists that emerged in the US in the early 1980s (with, for example, Louise Lawler and Richard Prince), Johnson is the ‘artist’s artist’ par excellence, highly respected by fellow practitioners and students – he has taught at the Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles for many years – but little known outside of these circles. (Raven Row)

Services and prayers for the Church
of England

Church of England

2000–2012

The Church of England’s broad family of prayer books have been designed by the studio over more than 10 years, following the redesign of the main edition by Derek Birdsall in 2000. Read John Morgan’s account of the making of Common Worship.

‘Printing and religion have a long and intimately connected history. The first book to be printed from movable type was a Bible, and ever since then the faiths – especially the Christian faith – have been carried, developed, spread, and challenged by this marvellous human invention. For a typographer, the chance to design a new edition of one of the central books of worship must surely be a forbidding task. At the designer’s back is a great legacy of publication, the bulk of it from the centuries before “design” came to be a profession separate from the editing of texts and the printing of them. It would seem wrong to impose “design” on such a book. Rather, the book should be allowed to design itself. That is an old credo, and one with which Derek Birdsall and John Morgan, the designers of this new work, have long been familiar. Though still in his twenties, Morgan grew up with this precept as a student of typography at the University of Reading. Birdsall’s career is now in its fourth decade and he has vast experience. But in no other of the jobs he has tackled can this injunction have been more deeply true.’ (Robin Kinross, Baseline 33, 2001)

Words by Joseph Conrad

A Work by Fiona Banner

with photographs by Paolo Pellegrin

Four Corners Books

Co-published with The Vanity Press

325 × 245mm, 312 pp

2015

The twelfth volume in the Four Corners Familiars series – where artists create a new edition of a classic novel – is Joseph Conrad's Heart Of Darkness.

‘In 2012, Fiona Banner was invited to create an exhibition of works drawn from the Archive of Modern Conflict, a London-based collection of photographs and ephemera relating to war and conflict. After much time delving into the archive, Banner observed a lack of images relating to conflict in the here and now. In a reversal of roles, Banner commissioned Paolo Pellegrin, a Magnum conflict photographer who has worked extensively in the Congo, to observe the City of London – its streets and trading floors, its costume and surrounding strip-clubs – through Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. The resulting photographs were first exhibited at Peer, London under the title Mistah Kurtz – He Not Dead.’ (Four Corners Books)


Words by Joseph Conrad

A Work by Fiona Banner

with photographs by Paolo Pellegrin

Four Corners Books

Co-published with The Vanity Press

325 × 245mm, 312 pp

2015

The twelfth volume in the Four Corners Familiars series – where artists create a new edition of a classic novel – is Joseph Conrad's Heart Of Darkness.

‘In 2012, Fiona Banner was invited to create an exhibition of works drawn from the Archive of Modern Conflict, a London-based collection of photographs and ephemera relating to war and conflict. After much time delving into the archive, Banner observed a lack of images relating to conflict in the here and now. In a reversal of roles, Banner commissioned Paolo Pellegrin, a Magnum conflict photographer who has worked extensively in the Congo, to observe the City of London – its streets and trading floors, its costume and surrounding strip-clubs – through Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. The resulting photographs were first exhibited at Peer, London under the title Mistah Kurtz – He Not Dead.’ (Four Corners Books)


By Jules Verne
Music by Jonny Trunk
Art Direction by John Morgan 

Cover illustration by Liam Sparkes

Four Corners Books

310 × 305 mm, 124 pp
2016

The latest in the Four Corners Familiars series, where artists are asked to create new artwork to illustrate a classic novel, puts a new twist on the notion of illustration, which this time takes the form of music accompanying Jules Verne’s classic tale of underwater adventure. Newly composed music is on a colour vinyl LP that slips inside a book of the complete Verne novel. For readers who haven’t kept their old turntables, the book comes with instructions on how to download an MP3 version of the atmopspheric music to listen to while you read. (Four Corners Books)
Jonny Trunk’s previous albums are The Inside Outside (2004) and Scrapbook (2009). He also runs Trunk Records, a record label specialising in library and film music, early electronic music and the downright weird. He says: ‘When Four Corners came to me with the idea of a book and record for their Familiars series, Twenty Thousand Leagues was an instant choice. I’ve been a collector of underwater sounds and soundtracks (think Jacques Cousteau) for many years and this would give me the perfect excuse to make my own subaquatic soundscapes. I hope the results conjure up visions through the Nautilus portholes and strange walking adventures along the sea bed. Thanks for listening.’

'What is this thing of Whiteness’ (Moby Dick)
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A pilgrimage of sorts

230 × 153 mm, 416 pp

Chatto & Windus

2015

 

'What is this thing of whiteness?'
We have designed Edmund de Waal’s new book The White Road, and produced the exhibition graphics for White, a project in the Royal Academy Library.

'From classical Greek statuary to a marble lantern by Ai Weiwei, and from Kazimir Malevich’s Suprematist Teapot to porcelain pots by de Waal, diverse artworks united by the colour white await discovery alongside little known parts of the Academy’s own collections, including J.M.W. Turner’s porcelain palette. Interspersed amongst the library’s shelves and cabinets, these unexpected encounters invite a quiet and serendipitous journey of discovery.' (Royal Academy)

Juergen Teller

320 × 235 mm, 84 pp

Published by Contemporary Fine Arts Berlin
and Snoeck 

‘I got tired of smoking and drinking. This clinic is the best thing I’ve done for my body and for my mind.
For my 50th birthday, my cousin Helmut gave me the most profound, beautiful and striking present. He made books out of my Dad’s slide photographs , which were stored and forgotten.Looking at those books made me cry. Dad killing himself, but seeing in those photographs it was not all dark days and realising what a great photographer he was. Being in Austria in this clinic, I remembered suddenly all those Austrian holidays and it made me think of those books my cousin made.’ Juergen Teller

The Valentino Turret Clock strikes five.
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with David Chipperfield Architects

2014

Design of a clock for the Valentino New York Flagship Store, Fifth Avenue, New York. 

Driade

Photography Simon Menges

320 × 250 mm, 40pp

Design concept and art direction

September 2015
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Graphic identity, Art Direction

September 2013–ongoing

ArtReview, founded in London in 1949, evolved from an eight-page, black-and-white broadsheet to a magazine distributed in 28 countries and published nine times a year. Since the first issue in the 1940s, the cover has traditionally featured a self-portrait. Following our total redesign of the magazine and its sister publication ArtReview Asia in September 2013, we continue to art direct and develop the design of each issue and special editions, including the Power 100 and Future Greats. 

Graphic identity, Art Direction

September 2013–ongoing

ArtReview, founded in London in 1949, evolved from an eight-page, black-and-white broadsheet to a magazine distributed in 28 countries and published nine times a year. Since the first issue in the 1940s, the cover has traditionally featured a self-portrait. Following our total redesign of the magazine and its sister publication ArtReview Asia in September 2013, we continue to art direct and develop the design of each issue and special editions, including the Power 100 and Future Greats. 

Stories by Jane Bowles

and Denton Welch

Art by Colter Jacobsen

Four Corners Books

225 × 145 mm, 152 pp

2009

Nominated for the Design Museum Designs of Year 2011.
The fifth book in the Four Corners Familiars series.

 

 

Essay by Glenn Adamson

HackelBury Fine Art and Filtow
164 pp

2015

Bliss features over fifty unique dye-destruction prints transformed as editioned objects on a monumental scale; the culmination of almost forty years practice using this material. The making of dye-destruction prints will reach a necessary end in 2016; the unique objects of the past transitioning into a repository for the future. 

Bliss celebrates the beginning of this new era, in the form of a richly illustrated artists’ book. In a limited run of six hundred, each book includes a signed and numbered Lambda c-print from a choice of forty-nine available images, approximately 20 x 24” according to individual format, with each image limited to an edition of ten. 

6a Architects

Park Books, Zurich

215 × 150 mm, 78pp

2015

Dust Free Friends is a manual for making a series of plywood furniture at home, designed by 6a architects. The rules are easy to follow, and even easier to change, to make best use of the sheet of plywood with the smallest number of cuts and least wastage.

We have designed the Dust Free Friends website here www.dustfreefriends.co.uk

By Nikolai Gogol and Rick Buckley

Four Corners Books

195 × 130 mm, 96 pp

2015

The eleventh book in the Four Corners Familiars series.


The Nose is a satirical short story with an unlikely protagonist. Taking on a life of its own, the nose of a St. Petersburg official leaves its rightful place to cause havoc in the city. This edition includes photographs by artist Rick Buckley documenting a Gogol-inspired street intervention where he fixed plaster noses on to buildings all over London.

with Caruso St John Architects

2014

Design of Alpha and Omega symbols engraved on the chancel cross.
Photograph by Hélène Binet. 

By Nikolai Gogol and Sarah Dobai

Four Corners Books

287 × 215 mm, 88 pp

2015

The tenth book in the Four Corners Familiars series.

In The Overcoat, a lowly government clerk's life is briefly transformed by the extravagant purchase of a new coat. This new edition is accompanied by artwork from Sarah Dobai, who has taken a series of photographs of shop windows in London and Paris to reflect upon the story’s preoccupation with material desire and illusion.

Art direction for the Power 100 issue. Photography Mikael Gregorsky
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Graphic identity, Art Direction

September 2013–ongoing

ArtReview, founded in London in 1949, evolved from an eight-page, black-and-white broadsheet to a magazine distributed in 28 countries and published nine times a year. Since the first issue in the 1940s, the cover has traditionally featured a self-portrait. Following our total redesign of the magazine and its sister publication ArtReview Asia in September 2013, we continue to art direct and develop the design of each issue and special editions, including the Power 100 and Future Greats. 

Wellcome Collection
1 / 58

Wellcome Collection

Exhibition graphics, posters, environmental graphics, books, merchandise

with Casper Mueller Kneer Architects

2014

‘“The history of science is part of the history of the freedom to observe, to reflect, to experiment, to record, and to bear witness. It has been a perilous and a passionate history indeed, and not yet ended.”
Alan Gregg, from the Preface to Sexual Behavior in the Human Male,
Alfred C Kinsey, 1948


This exhibition provides a brief introduction to sexology – the study and classification of human sexuality. Presenting examples from the last 150 years it considers the different methods of some of the researchers, activists and campaigners who adopted a scientific approach to the study of sex. Whether motivated by the desire to cure ‘perversions’, liberate repressed desires or track disease, these individuals attempted to lift the perceived taboo on the discussion of sex and present it as a legitimate topic for enquiry. The questions they raised, sometimes at great risk to themselves, are still fuelling the debates taking place today.’

The exhibition runs from the 20th November 2014 to the 20th September 2015

Talk at The Serving Library, Tate Liverpool, 05.02.15
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Tabloid, 24 pp 

Poster 841 × 594 mm

2006

The Invisible University imagines public space as an electronic surface enclosing the globe. This approach is described as New Pastoralism in order to evoke a setting for creative action about technology and nature.

The Invisible University responds to a specific set of conditions affecting design education. The traditional expectations, structures and infrastructures of a design education have to change with respect to current conditions, specifically: the proliferation of mobile and wireless technology, cheap air travel, overpriced rental accommodation in the UK, a growing global energy crisis and slow deployment of robotics.


The Invisible University exists anywhere, anytime and for as long as you need it to last. The Invisible University exists only in relation to time and the recording of it, as a demonstration of how technology in all its forms can simultaneously connect people with past, present and future natural and unnatural environments.

The poster prospectus (some pages of which are published here) presents network listings for current Invisible University departments established since 2003. All staff are researchers and determine and coordinate their own timetables.

The IU has no fixed administration.

The Invisible University continues to be explored and developed by David Greene with Samantha Hardingham at the Research Centre for Experimental Practice (EXP), University of Westminster. The project is currently researching a new model for design education.

Newspaper: All IU Departments; President: David Greene; Protagonist: Samantha Hardingham; Graphic design: John Morgan studio; Poster text: David Greene

Stencil alphabet designed for Common Ground, Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

 

‘There are shared common associations with architects and stencils, part of the attraction being that stencils appear built and engineered. The zinc stencils (still) manufactured by Thévenon & Cie are now emblematic of Corbusier. More significantly, stencils have traditionally been used as a convenient and economical form of “public lettering” as “everyday letters” (literally “lettres à jour”, through which you see daylight when held up). More crucially on a practical level for our exhibition design, here is a letterform perfectly suited to signage and public notices of a temporary nature. When applied as a stencil there’s a painterly quality that can’t be matched by vinyl. It seems likely the Nizioleti stencil system dates from Napolean’s occupation, and we see similar typeforms produced by Jean Gabriel Bery in Paris from c.1781. There are the inevitable variations in letterform through time too. Our stencil was far from a faithful revival or reflection (that would be the ultimate narcissistic action in this most vain of cities). Through a process of reflection and refraction we produced a letterform that was similar but not the same. We picked and mixed those characters that suited us, focusing on those with the highest frequency in the title, selecting an “O” with a perverse double cut, and an “R” with a loose curled tail (clipped from the mane of St Mark’s lion).’  (Extract from John Morgan, Common Ground, A letter from Venice, Eye magazine blog, 2012)


Our graphic identity for Common Ground was winner of the graphics category in the Design Museum Designs of the Year 2013. See the project here.

We have designed the latest issue. Launch in September 2014.
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Edited by Stephen Willats

305 × 245 mm, 32 pp

2014

Control Magazine acts as a vehicle for proposals and explanations of art practice between artists seeking to create a meaningful engagement with contemporary society.

Published and edited by Stephen Willats, this pioneering magazine has documented the work of many artists, both from the UK and abroad and encouraged a wide discussion of artists’ practices. It has included contributions and original pieces from an extensive range of artists over its eighteen issues. Since 1965, the magazine has published work and writing by over 150 artists, including John Latham, Roy Ascot, Anthony Benjamin, Dan Graham, Mary Kelly, Helen Chadwick, Tony Cragg, Dennis Adams, Lawrence Weiner, Anish Kapoor, Martha Rosler, Jeremy Deller, alongside collectives and collaboratives such as Gallerie in Friedrichstrasse, Artists Placement Group and early producer’s galleries such as that of Dieter Hacker. Many of the artists have made artwork specially for the magazine.

Services and prayers for the Church
of England

Church of England

2000–2012

The Church of England’s broad family of prayer books have been designed by the studio over more than 10 years, following the redesign of the main edition by Derek Birdsall in 2000. Read John Morgan’s account of the making of Common Worship.

‘Printing and religion have a long and intimately connected history. The first book to be printed from movable type was a Bible, and ever since then the faiths – especially the Christian faith – have been carried, developed, spread, and challenged by this marvellous human invention. For a typographer, the chance to design a new edition of one of the central books of worship must surely be a forbidding task. At the designer’s back is a great legacy of publication, the bulk of it from the centuries before “design” came to be a profession separate from the editing of texts and the printing of them. It would seem wrong to impose “design” on such a book. Rather, the book should be allowed to design itself. That is an old credo, and one with which Derek Birdsall and John Morgan, the designers of this new work, have long been familiar. Though still in his twenties, Morgan grew up with this precept as a student of typography at the University of Reading. Birdsall’s career is now in its fourth decade and he has vast experience. But in no other of the jobs he has tackled can this injunction have been more deeply true.’ (Robin Kinross, Baseline 33, 2001)

Nominated for Design Museum Designs of Year 2012
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Edited by Tom Weaver 

Architectural Association

297 × 245 mm

2008–ongoing

First published in 1981, AA Files is the Architectural Association’s journal of record. It contains essays and articles on architectural history and criticism, work by contemporary practitioners and designers, photography and art. It was redesigned by John Morgan studio in 2008, from issue 57 onwards.

‘There are two ways of looking at graphic design. You can over value technological change. The technological-revolution-that-is-changing-everything is all that matters. You would then consider only the very latest innovations in design as being meaningful. The ipad magazine app that came out last week that “shows us the future of magazines”. The phone coming out next week with a swizzy new screen that displays text with unparalleled clarity. With this view, any design that is not about exploiting technology is regarded as pretty much passé. Irrelevant. Another way of looking at design is that you can see it as a continuum. That the challenges of making magazines, for example, are essentially the same today as they were twenty or forty or sixty years ago. This argument says that although the media that deliver us the reading experience are changing by the hour – our eyes and brain are not changing, and that the experience of reading and looking are pretty much the same as they always have been.

AA Files is produced using some of the latest technology, but produced as old technology. A magazine, printed with ink on paper. But, in its old-fashioned way, I think AA Files is a fabulous example of both design and content. A perfect marriage of the two. Magazines need to be attractive, clear, powerful, coherent and identifiable, and yet full of incident and change. Magazine the word is derived from the Arabic for a store-house (transliterated as makhzan). AA files is a magical store-house. For what is ostensibly a magazine about architecture – the house magazine for members of the Architectural Association – the content is the freest possible definition of architecture and its concerns.’ (Quentin Newark, 2011)

Design of graphic identity, printed exhibition materials, website and exterior signs since Raven Row gallery opened

2009–ongoing

In 2009 we created a system in which a new sign was produced for each exhibition. An image of this single artwork was used for invitations, advertisements and online. The 19 signs were produced using various techniques including sign-painting, silkscreen printing, traffolyte engraving, perspex-moulding and chalk drawing. In 2013 we manufactured a permanent cast-iron exterior sign. Each exhibition has its own project page on this site – follow the links in the related projects menu (the archive of signs can also be seen in the past exhibitions index on the Raven Row website). The Raven Row website programming is by Studio Scasascia.

‘London’s jaw-droppingly elegant new space’ (Adrian Searle, the Guardian)

‘Raven Row is a non-profit contemporary art exhibition centre in Spitalfields that is open free to the public, Wednesdays to Sundays. It has been constructed within eighteenth-century domestic rooms, onto which 6a architects have added two contemporary galleries, and it stands on the part of Artillery Lane that was known as Raven Row until 1895.’ (Raven Row)

Edited by Ryan Gander and John Morgan
Koenig Books
365 × 255 mm, 560 pp
2014 

Published to coincide with the exhibition Ryan Gander: Make every show like it’s your last at Manchester Art Gallery, 3 July – 14 September 2014.

 

Art direction of 4 covers. Future Greats, March 2014
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Graphic identity, Art Direction

September 2013–ongoing

ArtReview, founded in London in 1949, evolved from an eight-page, black-and-white broadsheet to a magazine distributed in 28 countries and published nine times a year. Since the first issue in the 1940s, the cover has traditionally featured a self-portrait. Following our total redesign of the magazine and its sister publication ArtReview Asia in September 2013, we continue to art direct and develop the design of each issue and special editions, including the Power 100 and Future Greats. 

2008–ongoing

We produced a new graphic identity for the international architectural practice in 2008. The scope of works covered design of all printed and electronic matter for offices in London, Berlin, Milan and Shanghai. The extensive identity manual and the design of over 200 templates enables the practice to produce communication items sympathetically and efficiently in house. Our relationship continues with collaboration and consultation on many projects, including publications, exhibitions, identities, wayfinding and signage on buildings. Exhibitions include the Venice Biennale 2012, and ‘Form Matters’ at the Design Museum London 2009; publications include ‘Neues Museum Berlin’ (Walter König 2009) and a new monograph (Walter König 2013). Signage projects include Turner Contemporary, Café Royal, HEC Paris and Fundación/Colección Jumex. Key individual projects are displayed in their own project section within this site.


The Venice Biennale graphic identity and campaign won the graphic design category of the Design Museum Designs of the Year 2013.

 

Winner of graphics category Design Museum Designs of Year 2013
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Graphic identity, exhibition graphics, posters, environmental graphics,

books, merchandise 

2012

 

‘The Venetian stencil street signs or Nizioletti don’t prevent you from getting lost in the labyrinth, but they do comfort you or allow you to get lost in the most elegant way. They speak to you not in an Italian but a Venetian dialect – “Calle” rather than “Via”. Given their frequency, that they don’t irritate or disturb is a measure of their visual properties – they must be the most beautiful of city sign systems (the v-incised Bath street names defined by light and shade alone follow closely behind). The stencil text is contained in a white plaster panel – Nizioletti means “white sheet or cover” – roughly framed in black. The text is also painted black, but this black like so much in Venice has undertones of blue, a prussian blue (the blue used in blueprints) or a deep black water. To the passer-by the white rectangle often appears to be positioned in alignment with the interior ceiling ribbed with beams. The sheets which stack like sails when there’s lots to say, expand and contract to fit the content. There’s a hierarchy in size, the larger type of a sestiere (district) would sit above a smaller bridge name. The black blue text switches to brick red for key directional signs (and to a more recent reflective yellow). These point with a beautiful arrow, whose head is spliced from its own tail, leaving the bony silhouette of a vorticist fish.

These forms were irresistible to me when David Chipperfield, the Director of the 13th Venice Architecture Biennale, invited my studio to create a graphic identity for “Common Ground”. The body of work spanned across four publications, exhibition graphics, signage, posters, printed matter and more uniquely banners for bridges and wraps for Vaporettos. The theme Common Ground celebrated interconnected architectural culture and explored the things architects have in common, from the conditions of practice, to influences, collaborations and histories.’ (John Morgan, Eye magazine). Read more.

Nominated for Design Museum Designs of Year 2011
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Series designer: John Morgan 

Print production: Martin Lee

Four Corners Books

2007–ongoing

Four Corners Familiars is a series of books featuring artists’ responses to classic novels and short stories. They provide a fresh look at the tradition of the illustrated novel, with each artist choosing a text to be reprinted in full alongside their newly created work. Each book is different in style and format, according to the needs of the artwork and the text. Nine titles have now been completed, with more being prepared. 


1. The Picture of Dorian Gray
2. Dracula
3. Blumfeld, An Elderly Bachelor
4. Nau Sea Sea Sick
5. A Stick of Green Candy
6. Vanity Fair
7. The Prisoner of Zenda
8. Madame Bovary
9. Some Canterbury Tales
10. The Overcoat
11. The Nose


Each book has its own project within this site. Follow the links in the related projects menu.


‘The collaboration between John Morgan, Four Corners Publishing and three contemporary artists (Gareth Jones, James Pyman and David Musgrave) has been one of the most toothsome ongoing treats of 2008. Each volume is a brilliantly well-considered and fresh approach to a classic text, with the artists providing a contemporary take on the art of book illustration and Morgan exercising his estimable powers as one of today’s most assured, imaginative and intelligent book designers. So far The Picture of Dorian Gray, Dracula and Kafka's Blumfeld: An Elderly Batchelor have enjoyed the Four Corners Familiars treatment in 2008. We can't wait for more in 2009.’ (Grafik magazine, 2008)

Nominated for Design Museum Designs of Year 2011 

Signage, wayfinding, printed matter for Tate Britain
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Signage and wayfinding with Ian Whybrow 

2013–15

 

We were commissioned to review the signage and wayfinding as part of the Tate Britain Millbank project under the building master plan by Caruso St John architects. The existing sign system had developed in an ad hoc manner, resulting in disjointed layers of disparate sign systems, compounded by the use of a scheme, typography and materials developed principally as a graphic identity for a sister building, Tate Modern – an environment very different in atmosphere and architecture.

We reduced the presence of signs and promotional material to an ‘essential only’ state, and integrated the signage with the architectural, structural and operational requirements of the building. Whereas very present ‘supergraphics’ may be appropriate in a noisy, fast environment, the requirements in a gallery like this are different. The signage could be less present and more dignified.

As part of the re-hang, and the ‘Walk through British Art’ display, the gallery layout has been reconfigured to create a circuit around its outer perimeter, exploiting the long enfilades of galleries that open onto each another. The circuit travels anti-clockwise around the building, with threshold dates sign-painted onto the floor to tell you where you are in time. This is supported by a schematic map of the chronological circuit cut in brass. Permanent aluminium captions and labels are painted to match the wall colours, angled and positioned below the artworks. The emphasis is on looking rather than reading first (more contextual information is given in the new Tate Britain Companion). Where possible and appropriate, we replaced unsympathetic vinyl donor accreditation with sign-painted gilt letterforms painted directly onto walls by Phil Surey. We designed a new display typeface inspired by Bowles – a ‘British vernacular’ letterform for a British building. This letterform is cast in brass for external signs and silkscreened directly onto the interior walls. Where the ‘Tate Pro’ typeface is used, we commissioned an expert set of numerals – a better fit for the number-heavy data we were presenting. As part of a ‘total’ scheme for Tate Britain, we designed templates for new maps, menus, banners and posters.

Ragnar Kjartansson subscription ad
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Graphic identity, Art Direction

September 2013–ongoing

ArtReview, founded in London in 1949, evolved from an eight-page, black-and-white broadsheet to a magazine distributed in 28 countries and published nine times a year. Since the first issue in the 1940s, the cover has traditionally featured a self-portrait. Following our total redesign of the magazine and its sister publication ArtReview Asia in September 2013, we continue to art direct and develop the design of each issue and special editions, including the Power 100 and Future Greats. 

London Art Book Fair, Whitechapel Gallery

Sunday 28 September, 2014. John Morgan studio hosts an afternoon of design criticism, therapeutic destruction and discussion.

Palette portrait of John Morgan by Ryan Gander
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July 2014

Koenig Books

Edited by Ryan Gander and John Morgan. Book launch in October 2014. Full project page coming soon.

By Oscar Wilde

Art by Gareth Jones

Four Corners Books

350 × 285 mm, 128 pp

2007 

 

Nominated for Design Museum Designs of Year 2011
The first book in the Four Corners Familiars series.

 
‘The “Familiars” series, which commenced last autumn with an acclaimed new edition of Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890), designed by John Morgan to a concept and art work by Gareth Jones, is a bravura example of how an iconic book might be re-enacted. Returning, on the one hand, to the publishing history of Wilde’s novel, which first appeared in print on 20 June 1890, as pages 3–100 of Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine, the “Familiars” edition restored the book to its physical form as a large-format, magazine-style publication. The pages turn over with languid ease, as though to the neat flick of a doubtlessly yellow-gloved hand. The phrase “A young man of extraordinary personal beauty” is printed on the pale blue cover in dense black letters. Wilde’s famous preface to his novel, in the form of a succession of aphorisms (concluding “All art is quite useless”), is printed in large italics, with entire pages and double-page spreads luxuriously given over to the rolling flow of each maxim and paradox. The effect is to refresh and dramatize one’s reading of the text, while also reminding the reader of the complexities of Wilde’s cultural enshrinement. And yet this is only one half of the artistic formula at work in The Picture of Dorian Gray as reconceived by Jones. By way of design, motif, typography and, most importantly, the inclusion within the text (as illustration) of advertisements for Gitanes cigarettes – originally made in the 1970s by the Hipgnosis advertising agency for UK print media and featuring suave, Gallically handsome male models – Jones re-routes the novel to both concepts of masculine beauty and the reclamation of Art Nouveau and Wildean foppishness within the subcultural pop styling and fashions of the early 1970s.’ (Michael Bracewell, Editions of You, Frieze 116, 2008)

By Irénée Scalbert and 6a architects

Park Books, Zurich

210 × 140, 176pp

2013

Architectural critic Irénée Scalbert explores the role of narrative, history, appropriation and craft in the work of 6a architects.

‘This book is a significant achievement in architectural publishing, not only capturing the spirit of 6a but itself embodying a deeply welcome orientation to the concreteness of architecture, the nature of its practice and the culture of its constituents.’ (Architecture Today)

Design of graphic identity, printed exhibition materials, website and exterior signs since Raven Row gallery opened

2009–ongoing

In 2009 we created a system in which a new sign was produced for each exhibition. An image of this single artwork was used for invitations, advertisements and online. The 19 signs were produced using various techniques including sign-painting, silkscreen printing, traffolyte engraving, perspex-moulding and chalk drawing. In 2013 we manufactured a permanent cast-iron exterior sign. Each exhibition has its own project page on this site – follow the links in the related projects menu (the archive of signs can also be seen in the past exhibitions index on the Raven Row website). The Raven Row website programming is by Studio Scasascia.

‘London’s jaw-droppingly elegant new space’ (Adrian Searle, the Guardian)

‘Raven Row is a non-profit contemporary art exhibition centre in Spitalfields that is open free to the public, Wednesdays to Sundays. It has been constructed within eighteenth-century domestic rooms, onto which 6a architects have added two contemporary galleries, and it stands on the part of Artillery Lane that was known as Raven Row until 1895.’ (Raven Row)

Clip from a short film by John Morgan and Michael Harvey

2011

Introduction to a film screening at X Marks the Boekship, 2012:
‘Apologies for not being here, but I have nothing to say… and have asked somebody else to say it. They have a French Swiss accent – saying nothing with a French Swiss accent always sounds better.

I made this short film called “Blank Dummy” with a friend Michael Harvey. Initially it was an excuse to make a poster, which I still haven’t made…

It’s a re-enactment of a meeting I had with a publisher and production team. This is how it really happened, all true, though you may find the ending unbelievable. It really did happen just as this film. By making this film, I wouldn’t need to tell the story again. My intention was to cast a young beautiful boy as myself, sadly the actor who turned up didn’t correspond to his photograph or the image of myself. So we see here the ritual abuse and “reading” of a blank book.’


The film will be shown in full here soon. 

Art direction of ArtReview from September 2013
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Graphic identity, Art Direction

September 2013–ongoing

ArtReview, founded in London in 1949, evolved from an eight-page, black-and-white broadsheet to a magazine distributed in 28 countries and published nine times a year. Since the first issue in the 1940s, the cover has traditionally featured a self-portrait. Following our total redesign of the magazine and its sister publication ArtReview Asia in September 2013, we continue to art direct and develop the design of each issue and special editions, including the Power 100 and Future Greats. 

2008–ongoing

We produced a new graphic identity for the international architectural practice in 2008. The scope of works covered design of all printed and electronic matter for offices in London, Berlin, Milan and Shanghai. The extensive identity manual and the design of over 200 templates enables the practice to produce communication items sympathetically and efficiently in house. Our relationship continues with collaboration and consultation on many projects, including publications, exhibitions, identities, wayfinding and signage on buildings. Exhibitions include the Venice Biennale 2012, and ‘Form Matters’ at the Design Museum London 2009; publications include ‘Neues Museum Berlin’ (Walter König 2009) and a new monograph (Walter König 2013). Signage projects include Turner Contemporary, Café Royal, HEC Paris and Fundación/Colección Jumex. Key individual projects are displayed in their own project section within this site.


The Venice Biennale graphic identity and campaign won the graphic design category of the Design Museum Designs of the Year 2013.

 

By Gustave Flaubert

Translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling

A work by Marc Camille Chaimowicz

Four Corners Books

210 × 270 mm, 536 pp

2013

The eighth book in the Four Corners Familiars series.

Comprising photographs, collages and found objects, this edition of Madame Bovary, illustrated by Marc Camille Chaimowicz, chronicles Emma Bovary’s attempts to escape the banalities of provincial life. For this edition we created the typeface ‘Berthe’, named after Bovary’s neglected child. To read more about Berthe click here.

By Bram Stoker

Art by James Pyman

Four Corners Books

240 × 148 mm, 496 pp
2008 

 

 

Nominated for Design Museum Designs of Year 2011.
The second book in the Four Corners Familiars series.


‘John Morgan’s meticulous reading of Dracula, Bram Stoker’s classic and complex “novel” (originally published in 1897) results in a golden, golden-section edition. As one of the characters repeatedly refers to the (then) modern invention of the typewriter, Morgan has set Mina Harker’s journal entries in a quirky version of typewriter type (Remington, of course!). In fact, each character’s chapters are set in their own dedicated typeface, including Bulmer, Goudy and Akzidenz Grotesque (a font first released in 1896). Even a two-line telegram is set in Orator Standard, exactly matching a telegram of the time. The book’s binding is reminiscent of The Yellow Book – another near-contemporary. Except that, instead of black, the blocking of the stylish title-piece is blood red – as are the endpapers, the head-and-tail-bands, and the tops of the pages. The reproduction of the delicate illustrations (by James Pyman), the choice of paper and the golden-section format add up to an elegant and most satisfying example of modern book design and production (production supervised by Martin Lee).’ (Derek Birdsall, Eye magazine blog, 2009)

Nominated for Design Museum Designs of Year 2012
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Edited by Tom Weaver 

Architectural Association

297 × 245 mm

2008–ongoing

First published in 1981, AA Files is the Architectural Association’s journal of record. It contains essays and articles on architectural history and criticism, work by contemporary practitioners and designers, photography and art. It was redesigned by John Morgan studio in 2008, from issue 57 onwards.

‘There are two ways of looking at graphic design. You can over value technological change. The technological-revolution-that-is-changing-everything is all that matters. You would then consider only the very latest innovations in design as being meaningful. The ipad magazine app that came out last week that “shows us the future of magazines”. The phone coming out next week with a swizzy new screen that displays text with unparalleled clarity. With this view, any design that is not about exploiting technology is regarded as pretty much passé. Irrelevant. Another way of looking at design is that you can see it as a continuum. That the challenges of making magazines, for example, are essentially the same today as they were twenty or forty or sixty years ago. This argument says that although the media that deliver us the reading experience are changing by the hour – our eyes and brain are not changing, and that the experience of reading and looking are pretty much the same as they always have been.

AA Files is produced using some of the latest technology, but produced as old technology. A magazine, printed with ink on paper. But, in its old-fashioned way, I think AA Files is a fabulous example of both design and content. A perfect marriage of the two. Magazines need to be attractive, clear, powerful, coherent and identifiable, and yet full of incident and change. Magazine the word is derived from the Arabic for a store-house (transliterated as makhzan). AA files is a magical store-house. For what is ostensibly a magazine about architecture – the house magazine for members of the Architectural Association – the content is the freest possible definition of architecture and its concerns.’ (Quentin Newark, 2011)

 
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2011

Rudy was designed for an edition of The Prisoner of Zenda, the seventh book in the Four Corners Familiars series. Rudy is based on and inspired by Raymond Hains’ typographic experiments. The distortion of each letterform is rationalised to a mostly twice vertical repeat, which fits with the book’s overriding theme of doubles and gives the page the texture of blackletter. It is named after one of the book’s characters, King Rudolf Rassendyll of Ruritania (and one of John Morgan’s sons).

The Prisoner of Zenda project page can be seen here.

Graphic identity, website, printed matter, publications
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Programming by Studio Scasascia
2010–ongoing 

We began working with 6a architects during the development and construction of Raven Row gallery in 2009. Subsequently we have collaborated on numerous exhibitions in the gallery and designed a new website and graphic identity for the practice. Our design for ‘Never Modern’, the first book on their work and philosophy, can be seen here.


‘6a architects was founded by Tom Emerson and Stephanie Macdonald in 2001 after meeting at the Royal College of Art and has become one of the leading architectural practices in the UK. The practice has developed a particular reputation for award winning contemporary art galleries, educational and residential projects in sensitive historic environments. Recent projects include the critically acclaimed extension to the South London Gallery (New London Architecture Award 2011 and Civic Trust Award Commendation 2012), and Raven Row, a contemporary art gallery in Spitalfields, east London. In May 2011 Raven Row won an RIBA Award, was nominated for the Stirling Prize and was the only UK project selected by the Design Museum for the Brit Insurance Design Award.’ (6a architects)

By Oscar Wilde

Art by Gareth Jones

Four Corners Books

350 × 285 mm, 128 pp

2007 

 

Nominated for Design Museum Designs of Year 2011
The first book in the Four Corners Familiars series.

 
‘The “Familiars” series, which commenced last autumn with an acclaimed new edition of Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890), designed by John Morgan to a concept and art work by Gareth Jones, is a bravura example of how an iconic book might be re-enacted. Returning, on the one hand, to the publishing history of Wilde’s novel, which first appeared in print on 20 June 1890, as pages 3–100 of Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine, the “Familiars” edition restored the book to its physical form as a large-format, magazine-style publication. The pages turn over with languid ease, as though to the neat flick of a doubtlessly yellow-gloved hand. The phrase “A young man of extraordinary personal beauty” is printed on the pale blue cover in dense black letters. Wilde’s famous preface to his novel, in the form of a succession of aphorisms (concluding “All art is quite useless”), is printed in large italics, with entire pages and double-page spreads luxuriously given over to the rolling flow of each maxim and paradox. The effect is to refresh and dramatize one’s reading of the text, while also reminding the reader of the complexities of Wilde’s cultural enshrinement. And yet this is only one half of the artistic formula at work in The Picture of Dorian Gray as reconceived by Jones. By way of design, motif, typography and, most importantly, the inclusion within the text (as illustration) of advertisements for Gitanes cigarettes – originally made in the 1970s by the Hipgnosis advertising agency for UK print media and featuring suave, Gallically handsome male models – Jones re-routes the novel to both concepts of masculine beauty and the reclamation of Art Nouveau and Wildean foppishness within the subcultural pop styling and fashions of the early 1970s.’ (Michael Bracewell, Editions of You, Frieze 116, 2008)

Services and prayers for the Church of England
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Services and prayers for the Church
of England

Church of England

2000–2012

The Church of England’s broad family of prayer books have been designed by the studio over more than 10 years, following the redesign of the main edition by Derek Birdsall in 2000. Read John Morgan’s account of the making of Common Worship.

‘Printing and religion have a long and intimately connected history. The first book to be printed from movable type was a Bible, and ever since then the faiths – especially the Christian faith – have been carried, developed, spread, and challenged by this marvellous human invention. For a typographer, the chance to design a new edition of one of the central books of worship must surely be a forbidding task. At the designer’s back is a great legacy of publication, the bulk of it from the centuries before “design” came to be a profession separate from the editing of texts and the printing of them. It would seem wrong to impose “design” on such a book. Rather, the book should be allowed to design itself. That is an old credo, and one with which Derek Birdsall and John Morgan, the designers of this new work, have long been familiar. Though still in his twenties, Morgan grew up with this precept as a student of typography at the University of Reading. Birdsall’s career is now in its fourth decade and he has vast experience. But in no other of the jobs he has tackled can this injunction have been more deeply true.’ (Robin Kinross, Baseline 33, 2001)

Stories by Jane Bowles

and Denton Welch

Art by Colter Jacobsen

Four Corners Books

225 × 145 mm, 152 pp

2009

Nominated for the Design Museum Designs of Year 2011.
The fifth book in the Four Corners Familiars series.

 

 

Pierre Huyghe

314 × 241 mm, 212 pp

Published by The Artist’s Institute
and Koenig Books

The Magazine takes each season of The Artist’s Institute as a point of departure for new criticism, journalism, fiction, interviews, and artist projects, developed around the work of a single artist. The first issue is with Pierre Huyghe.

Pierre’s covers the recent work and research interests of Pierre Huyghe – featuring topics as varied as genetic engineering, new realist philosophy and the science fiction of Philip K. Dick – to draw a complex portrait of the artist’s practice. Contributors include A. E. Benenson, Stephen Blackwell, Ali H. Brivanlou, Etienne Chambaud, Ian Cheng, Angelique Corthals, Melissa Dubbin & Aaron S. Davidson, Tristan Garcia, Camille Henrot, David Horvitz, Pierre Huyghe, Jenny Jaskey, Jonathan Lethem, Alex Mar, Vladimir Nabokov, Vincent Normand, Fernando Ortega, Jean Painlevé, Sean Raspet, Martin Roth, Dorion Sagan, Dash Shaw, Fabrien Giraud and Raphaël Siboni, and Karl Sims.

Awarded one of The Most Beautiful Swiss Books of 2015.